July 10, 2014

Vent….I just want to vent

Most folks who follow some organized faith system (like myself) often (or at least try to) automate in times of pressure. What I simply mean is, we usually have prayers, verses, affirmations, and the like to remind us that “this too shall pass” and help us get through the days of struggle and strain. MOST times, that works. SOMETIMES, it doesn’t .

The last two years I have been tried beyond anything I could of conjured up in the most dramatic novel. I mean test after test, trial after trial. It’s been taxing. I can officially admit I’m tired (something I find myself saying more than any other time in my life). So close but yet so far. So close, but no cigar. However, I never see the need to quit. It never even comes up. I press on , press in, and continue, as one of my good friends like to say.

With all these challenges going across Social Media today, I have a challenge of my own. I challenge all of you to remove the word “quit” from your vocabulary. Things might not look so swell right now. So what. This will pass like every other trial before this one. Economic struggle can be hard, but it’s not impossible, and things will look up if you do. I’m actually preaching to myself, and inviting you all to listen. Thanks for your ear.

D-O

June 22, 2014

I’ve grown quite addicted to olives in my salad. – at Buckhead Neighborhood

View on Path

June 21, 2014

Good afternoon. Use this weekend to recharge your passion. – at Buckhead Neighborhood

View on Path

January 29, 2014

The best time to work! #atlanta #snowpocalypse2014

View on Path

January 19, 2014

Smart a** Sprint commercial. #NFLPlayoffs

View on Path

January 17, 2014

Portfolio. Greeting cards coming soon. #gydo – at The Office

View on Path

December 25, 2012

Trouble With The Curve

The new face of “geek” culture has arrived. Actually, it’s been here for some time. The reason I know this is because I’m part of it. Yeah, I’m one of ‘those’ guys. I don’t write code. I didn’t own a Commodore 64. And no, I don’t never worked in IT. Who I am, who we are, are a generation of folks from other cultures (music, art, entertainment) that love technology, well what technology has become.

Some say Social Media made us. I don’t think that’s a bad thing. We were social first. And herein lies the answer to the mystery of the “modern geek.” The original geek was a pockeet protector guy/gal in a world beyond folks like me. The world was secluded, dismal, and and basically secret. The “social” end of this was BBS boards and chat rooms WE couldn’t get into. And then then world changed. Social Media allowed folks like me to express ourselves through technology. We own iPads. We can blog on the go. And now, we’re part of the geek ecosystem.

For me, it has allowed me a TED talk, some awesome mentions in Mashable, and various keynotes at conferences, including some new best friends that are developers and designers. It has afforded me affiliations with some phenomenal incubators like Hypepotamus in Atlanta. And has me on a quest for the new model of the Music Business.

Some will love us. Others will not. But one thing is for sure….We’re here to stay.

September 3, 2012

Starting Over (again)

Anyone close to me knows how much of a fan I am of new beginnings. The ability to start anew is one of life’s secret pleasures. That being said, it amazes me how many people don’t treasure this jewel. Bishop Wilbert McKinley was fond of telling his congregation “look again.” He encouraged us to do that with everything from job interviews to spousal disagreements.

You see, sometimes we can get so involved with negative thinking that we convince ourselves something won’t work. When all we really need to do is step back, breathe, and start again.

August 31, 2012

The Truth About Pressure (My thoughts on Hip-Hop and the passing of Chris Lighty)

I knew Chris Lighty. Maybe not the way you may know him. I remember being young and from Brooklyn, fueding with his Bronx crew. Every week. And we both came back every week. There was something about comradary in those days, friend or foe, that just worked.

I remember when Hip-Hop labels were housed in one room. I remember seeing your manager every day. Things have changed. And I’d be lying to say that the most change didn’t come from making money. We got spoiled. We got careless. We grew apart. The beginning pinnings of Hip-Hop was all about togetherness. Showing up at the club everyone was at, finding out where everyone was buying their gear. We even did songs together to impact community (Self Destruction, Same Gang). Things have changed.

I can only pray, in light of recent events, we see this as a call to unity. If you’re in Atlanta, let’s link (I’ll more than likely invite you to church too, lol). Time is passing us by, and we’re losing the grip Bambaata, Herc, and Flash set up in the first place.

R.I.P. Chris Lighty.

April 3, 2012

Spike Lee could have shut up and hired me.

At the expense of sounding a little cocky, I’ll admit I’m one of the few Blacks (african-american if you prefer) in technology full-time. In addition to being a Social Media manager for political candidates, I provide digital strategies and traditional artist development for music companies. I know Twitter. I know Facebook. I know LinkedIn. I know Google+,I know Friendfeed, I could go on. Social Media is an excellent tool, but like all tools, it should be studied and tested for use. No person I know would use a weed wacker without proper instruction. However, this is precisely what Mr. Lee has done.

The strategy I offer to my clients decrees Twitter as the “megaphone” of Social Media activity. (While I’m at it, I’ll give you these for free; Facebook is the “conversation room” and LinkedIn is the “golf course”). Twitter is primed to make announcements that lead you to a larger conversation, on a capable network i.e., Facebook, Google Plus, etc.

Thus Spike Lee’s first mistake: No (conversation) plan for continuum of his Tweet.
Mr. Lee left no room for comment or crowdsource. A proper Social Media strategy would’ve had fans or followers to shout “WRONG PEOPLE, WRONG ADDRESS” from the rafters. Spike Lee never got the @gleonhard memo: “We’ve gone from the network [singular] to the networked [plural]. We’re now an interconnected web, and that includes some die hards that will do your fact-checking for you….duh.

Spike Lee mistake number two:  Another thing I make sure my clients know from a project’s inception is that, online, REPUTATION TAKES THE LONGEST TO BUILD. We know your movies Mr. Lee, but your online presence pales in comparison. You have no relationship with us–Blacks in technology (shameless friend plug, James Andrews, Baratunde Thurston, Rasheen Porter or Wayne Sutton)–all of which could have helped, even in putting out this fire you’ve started. Get with a Social Media manager and establish a presence online, you won’t make these bumbling mistakes, trust me.

Spike Lee mistake Le Grande: Misunderstanding the tool of Social Media. I say to music artists daily, “Your Facebook page is not your new street team.” Neither is your Twitter page Mr. Lee. Using Twitter as an announcement only tool really had you step in Brooklyn sidewalk dogshit (eew). Even Spike Lee went to film school. I’m not suggesting a full Social Media course, but a few doses  of Get Your Digital On would heal you bro.

Know what you’re stepping into before you step.

Like other Blacks in the space, we’re appalled, mostly because you didn’t check with us first. Spike, I can show you how to do this Social Media thing, and it’s cheaper than season tickets for the Knicks.               

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